Welcome to this safe and sacred space. Email me today at stephenie@stepheniefarrell.com to set up a free 30-minute consultation.

Loving Your Body Versus Accepting Your Body

After years of feeling shame about your body, believing you must love it can lead to frustration. Loving your entire body is a daunting task. Believe me, I know that. When I was very young, a relative of mine made a comment about my thighs. Although I was only a little girl, my conclusion was that there was something terribly wrong with me because my thighs were a certain size. I felt shame over my legs and carried shame and embarrassment throughout most of my life.

After years of feeling shame about your body, believing you must love it can lead to frustration. Loving your entire body is a daunting task. Believe me, I know that. When I was very young, a relative of mine made a comment about my thighs. Although I was only a little girl, my conclusion was that there was something terribly wrong with me because my thighs were a certain size. I felt shame over my legs and carried shame and embarrassment throughout most of my life.

After years of feeling shame about your body, believing you must love it can lead to frustration. Loving your entire body is a daunting task. Believe me, I know that. When I was very young, a relative of mine made a comment about my thighs. Although I was only a little girl, my conclusion was that there was something terribly wrong with me because my thighs were a certain size. I felt shame over my legs and carried shame and embarrassment throughout most of my life.

Here’s a simple exercise that shows you that accepting all aspects of your body isn’t such a daunting task:

This exercise can also inform you about where a particular belief about one part of your body came from and why you feel insecure about its size or appearance. Describe the characteristics of each part of your body and how you feel about it. Don’t pretend you like everything. Just notice what comes to mind. Maybe you want to write it down. Please remember that the word “fat” is NOT a feeling, so don’t use this word to describe how a body part makes you feel. For example: “My belly makes me feel fat.” Instead, say something like, “My thighs rub together when I exercise, so I feel embarrassed and uncomfortable. ” You may notice many parts of your body with which you feel fine, but there may be one part in particular that you struggle with. Whatever you need to work on, try to reframe your thoughts. Instead of hating your legs, for example, can you find a way to be grateful for them? For instance, your legs carry you from place to place, they may be strong, they may allow you to dance, or hike or run. This isn’t a cure-all. Of course, there’s deep work to do if you suffer from disordered eating and body-image dissatisfaction, but this may be a good starting point.

Stephenie Farrell

Stephenie helps women striving to achieve the perfect body feel empowered to create their most authentic, happiest and healthiest life, leaving food guilt and body shame behind for good.

If you want find out what working with Stephenie is like go ahead and book a 30-minute discovery session with her by clicking on the button below.

Book a Discovery Session